13 Aug 2018

McCorkle goes from Military to Moorhead

McCorkle
Growing up the youngest of six adopted children in the small city of Hollandale, William McCorkle often found himself on the wrong end of mischief. He grew up a rebellious teen who bounced from school to school and eventually dropped out of high school to join the Army.

He enlisted as an infantryman and attended basic training and advanced individual training at Fort Benning, Georgia. Once he graduated from training in 2006, McCorkle was assigned to Aco 3-187 INF 3rd Brigade 101st ABN ASST in Fort Campbell, Kentucky. 

He deployed for the first time at age 19 to Iraq where he spent over 14 months. He finished that deployment to return home with his unit only to deploy a second time 10 months later. He was deployed overseas three times during his active duty, twice to Afghanistan and once to Iraq.

McCorkle was informed during his last deployment he would not be allowed to reenlist due to military cutbacks. 

“This is where it really became difficult,” he says.

“I left the Army on March 10, 2014 and began my journey to find myself. What was my true purpose? As a husband and a father of a 2-year-old son and a newborn daughter, I had no idea what I wanted to do, much less what I was meant to do with my life.”

When he returned, he moved to Louisville, Kentucky with his family and bounced from job to job until he realized the big city life was not the right fit for him. McCorkle started to explore the possibility of going to college, which is when he realized he was still eligible to participate in athletics.

He decided to email different schools to see if they had open spots or tryouts. This is when he found himself coming home to Mississippi Delta Community College.

During the spring 2018 semester he enrolled in classes and was a walk-on on the defensive side of the ball for the Trojan football team. He soon realized the physical requirements of his Army career left his body drained of its ability to perform on the gridiron. He decided to trade his cleats in for a whistle and became a student assistant coach, a role he will be active in this fall. 

“I found my calling and was granted the greatest blessing I could hope for,” he says.

“The coaches saw that I had the potential to help the team, not as a player but as a coach. I was offered the opportunity to begin my coaching career while working towards my degree.”

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